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Simple Tips

Whenever I see a picture of something I'd like to "re-create," I cut the picture out and place it in an extra photo album (three photos per page type) for safe keeping until I can get to it. I also use them for the free project ideas I pick up at my local craft stores. That way, I don't have little pieces of paper floating around the house or in my trays of tools, findings, etc. (I also put my tips and tricks sheets in there.)

Simple Tips

This is just a suggestion on how to pick up dropped beads in the carpet. I recently dropped a whole hank of charlottes on the floor. I used my bar of beeswax to pick all of them up in no time at all.

Simple Tips

Before knotting silk thread, tie 1 end around a doorknob. Thread up over top of door, down under bottom, over top again and tie end to a brick that is just barely above the ground but not touching. Let stretch over night. Use double thickness when knotting.

Simple Tips

Feathers can easily be used in necklace and earring designs with small . Place the tip of the feather in the crimp. With your chain-nose pliers, bend the sides of the crimp down so they are flat against the back of the feather. The crimp has a loop at the top and can be attached to an earwire or strung on a necklace with a split ring.

Simple Tips

A great item to use to display or store your hook style earrings is the plastic mesh used by crafters. It can stand alone in a plate holder and they come in many colors.

Simple Tips

To create consistent wire-wrapped loops, mark a spot on the jaw of your round-nose pliers and use it as your guide every time you make a wire-wrapped loop. A permanent marker works great, and it eventually wears off of the metal.

Simple Tips

When looming beads, a sharp needle tip can split the threads and tangle. Use the needle eye first so you never split your threads. Or try dulling the needle tip by gently filing it so it doesn't do this.

Simple Tips

Self-adhesive finger pads, an alternative to thimbles used by tailors and garment designers, work great for beading and wirework, too. The pads stick to your fingertips and serve as a comfortable buffer against pokes from needles and wire.

Simple Tips

If you spill beads, stretch a knee high nylon across the opening of a vacuum hose and secure the nylon with either tape or a rubber band so that there is a little bit hanging loose that will suck up into the vacuum hose end . Then "vacuum" up the beads. Hold the vacuum over a dish when you turn it off and all the beads that were sucked up into the nylon will fall into the dish. Really makes it easy to pick up the beads!

Simple Tips

I use the plastic boxes that business cards come in to store and they stack well.

Simple Tips

Even the most durable beading needles can bend, putting a crimp in seed bead and other intricate beading projects. A pair of chain-nose and nylon-jaw pliers will help extend the life of your beading needles. Grasp the needle at the eye with the chain-nose pliers. Starting below the bend in the needle and gripping firmly, pull the needle through the nylon pliers. Repeat as necessary. With a little manipulation, your needle will be as straight as new.

Simple Tips

If you enjoy stringing on beading wire for its strength and flexibility, but want a more professionally finished look than a plain crimp bead, add and to your design. Crimp covers help to disguise the crimp with a rounded cover bead to make it look more like an actual bead, and wire guardians help to hide the wire and protect it from wearing on clasps and findings.

Simple Tips

Take a foot of 20# Fireline®, loop in middle, go through crimp bead, put Powercord® through the loop, then pull back through the crimp bead. Take out Fireline®. Crimp bead.

Simple Tips

When threading needles, instead of bringing the thread to the needle, hold the very tip of the thread between thumb and forefinger and lower the eye of the needle onto the thread. I find this technique much less frustrating.

Simple Tips

Toilet paper rolls are the perfect size for making napkin rings. For Art Clay™ projects, the roll disappears when the clay is fired. For polymer clay projects, simply pull the roll out of the design before firing.

Simple Tips

To keep your wire looking smooth and blemish free, using the right tools is essential. When making wrapped loops, using a pair of round-nose or chain-nose pliers will make nicely rounded shapes that close tightly. For jumprings that close securely and are not bent awkwardly or scratched, use two sets of fine flat-nose pliers. Avoid using non-jewelry pliers that have grooves or teeth, because they will scar and scratch the wire surface when they pinch down. Scratches from pliers can snag clothing and detract from the polished look.

Simple Tips

It is easier to make a symmetrical necklace if you mark the center of the thread or wire first. Then do short sections to match alternating on each side. It is easier to catch and correct a mistake.

Simple Tips

If you're out of beading needles, use a threader dental flosser instead! Make a knot in the loop and voila! :)

Simple Tips

I use over the door shoe organizers with clear pockets to store my beads and focals. They are organized by color to make it easy to find what I am looking for when creating a piece.

Simple Tips

If you like to make your own wire earring hoops, a cheap and sturdy mandrel can be made from the white connectors used for PVC. They come with outside dimensions from 1.25 to 2.75 inches making them perfect earring hoop sizes.
382 Resource(s) Found
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