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Simple Tips

Do you have an old tie-rack you're no longer using? Turn it into a space-saving display for your jewelry. The style of rack will determine how and what to display. Many styles rotate, making it easy to find necklaces and bracelets. Others are available in strips with double hooks ideal for earrings. Whether mounted to the wall or hanging from a hook, jewelry is tangle-free and easily accessible.

Simple Tips

When designing jewelry, the balance of color and texture are key. But balance doesn't necessarily mean symmetrical. Some designs require symmetry--the repetition being its charm. Other jewelry thrives on asymmetry, using color and texture as the balance. Large, freeform shapes on one side stylishly contrast long lengths of chain on the other. Mixed colors can work together without having a rhythm, the appeal being the varied pattern. In jewelry designs--anything goes!

Simple Tips

Bags of assorted beads are hard to pass up and even harder to sort. Instead of separating the beads individually, use a handheld grater to do the work for you. The smaller beads will pass through the grates while the larger seed beads and bugle beads will remain on the surface.

Simple Tips

When setting up your work area, ''wallpaper'' your walls with elements that will help you get organized and provide design inspiration. Use bead sample cards, paint swatches and hand-painted pegboards in inspiring colors. And stencil wall borders in your favorite jewelry silhouettes and shapes for eye-catching interest.

Simple Tips

When stringing long fringe or a continuous length of seed beads, make every 10th bead a slightly different color from the rest. This saves time since you can count the strung beads in a flash, and enhances the overall design.

Simple Tips

Add visual interest to wire creations by flattening or hammering your wire:

Simple Tips

Use liver of sulfur to create an aged look in metal jewelry. Soak the metal pieces in a liver sulfur bath and watch as the black tarnish darkens the surface and soaks deep into the coils and folds of the wire or metal. Then polish the black off the surface with a metal polishing cloth, leaving the aged color within the recesses.

Simple Tips

When multiple projects are taking over your work station, it's possible you'll run out of bead trays for the different colors and types of beads you are using all at once. This is the time to pull out the deviled egg tray you usually save for special occasions. It's the perfect size for holding beads and has an average of 12 additional compartments.

Simple Tips

Beading wire can scratch the wearer if it is sticking out or not clipped close enough to the crimp. A good technique to finish a necklace so that the wire is hidden is to make sure your last bead or two are large enough for the remainder of beading wire to be threaded back through and clipped.

Simple Tips

Here's the solution to inconsistent sizes and shapes in cultured freshwater pearls. Using a hole puncher, make two rows of 10 holes on a piece of cardstock. Apply masking tape to the backside of the cardstock, with the sticky side appearing through the holes. The tape is sticky enough to hold the pearls in place, but not enough to leave a residue. Compare the pearls from every angle to find the closest match.

Simple Tips

Copper wire will patina, or darken and discolor, with age. If you prefer to keep your copper wire bright, coat it with a clear sealer or polish before stringing and let dry. Soaking copper in white vinegar will help to clean it.

Simple Tips

It is easier to make a symmetrical necklace if you mark the center of the thread or wire first. Then do short sections to match alternating on each side. It is easier to catch and correct a mistake.

Simple Tips

This is just a suggestion on how to pick up dropped beads in the carpet. I recently dropped a whole hank of charlottes on the floor. I used my bar of beeswax to pick all of them up in no time at all.

Simple Tips

Not a question--but a helpful trick I discovered a new way to pick up beads on the floor and/or carpeting: use a lint roller and roll. They have very sticky sheets which are easily disposed of.

Simple Tips

Using foam insulation boards (from DIY stores) and 3M stick-ups, it is possible to "paper" walls with these "boards/panels." The glue on the stick-ups will not remove paint or wallpaper. Needing to see what pendants, etc. you have to work with is easy IF they are pinned to the panels with 1" brads--call them inspiration boards, if you want ... Also, the glue (on the 3-M picture tabs--IF you use enough of them) will hold up a panel with finished jewelry so that you can see completed items quickly. I use 10-12 stick-up tabs/panel, otherwise one might find the filled panel on the floor.

Simple Tips

I use an old wooden cup rack that you can hang on the wall to store my finished necklaces on ... Not only does it keep them from getting tangled up but it makes a really great display and it doesn't take up precious counter space in my workroom.

Simple Tips

If you buy seed beads in hanks, you are half-way to starting your seed bead project. Simply thread your beading wire or string through the beads while they're on the hank, then remove the hank's string. Your project will be on its way in no time at all! It's a great time-saver for loomwork, crocheting and knitting projects.

Simple Tips

Prescription bottles make great storage containers--I also peel the label off the bags and attach them to the prescription bottle. The plastic bags that the order is shipped in are used to 'stage' a customer's order and also to 'stage' materials for a project. Everything gets used!

Simple Tips

Jewelry that is strung using crimps should have a small loop that allows the clasp a little bit of movement in order to keep the wire from breaking or fraying from use under tension. To keep the loops of your beading wire even and large enough, insert one side of your round-nosed pliers into the loop while pulling the wire tight and crimping it down.

Simple Tips

You can use safety pins as your own personal wire coiling gizmo to create small wire coils for detailed wirework and maybe even for wire guardians.
378 Resources Found
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