Signing Your Jewelry--Signature Possibilities

Signing Your Jewelry--Signature Possibilities
by Jamie Smedley, Marketing Content Development Group, Exclusively for Fire Mountain Gems and Beads®

There are many reasons to sign a piece of jewelry. If you are considering custom signed jewelry, it is a small but effective way to brand your jewelry and elevate the perceived value.

Rembrandt, Picasso, Michelangelo and Klimt--what do they all have in common? Well, besides a stellar art career and a plethora of completed works, they all have a unique and recognizable signature that they used to identify their work. Should your designs and your artwork be any different?

The word ''signature'' has several connotations according to Webster. It can refer to the act of signing your name or surname to documents, or to have a unique quality or individual characteristic that displays individuality from others. It also means to apply a mark of ownership or authorship to artistic works.

So, how does one go about signing jewelry? For that answer, we revisit the vintage jewelry scene to see ideas and possible ways to sign or tag your jewelry. Often when searching vintage collector items of jewelry you will look to see a maker's mark, stamp or defining signature-style of construction that points to the author of the design. This mark will define creation dates and subsequent value of the piece in question. There are custom-stamped, molded and engraved logos, stamped charms and even pasted paper with a printed logo. While the paper signatures are seen in vintage jewelry, it is temporal and not recommended. Instead, try securing a signature graphic on paper under Pavelka Magic-Glos®, ICE Resin® or 2-part epoxy on the surface of a charm.

Another simple option is to set your initials punched with a hammered stamp onto a metal jewelry tag, or perhaps you will always incorporate an identical bead into your designs at the same place. Let's say, for example, your signature color is red so you always attach a red crystal to your designs near the clasps. The bottom line is your customers want to know that the jewelry they are buying from you is authentic and an original piece of artwork that you value enough to sign. So go ahead, sign your designs with artistic pride. Who knows? Perhaps years later your designs will be highly sought after and collectible because of an easily found signature you chose to use.

Here are some tools you could use to sign your designer jewelry: Additional Resources ...


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