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Tension (or Stop) Bead
Tension (or Stop) Bead
A tension bead (or stopper bead) holds your work in place. To make one, string a bead larger than those you are working with, then pass through the bead one or more times, making sure not to split your thread. The bead will be able to slide along but will still provide tension to work against when you're beading the first two rows.
Stringing
Stringing
A technique in which beads are gathered on a strand. Beading wire, needle and thread and other materials are used for stringing.
The History of Glass Beads
The History of Glass Beads
Discover the history of glass bead making, with roots in Ancient Rome and evolving through innovative techniques spurred by the advent of industrialization.
Tubular Herringbone Stitch
Tubular Herringbone Stitch
Begin with a foundation row of ladder stitch. Join the ends together to form a tube. String 2 beads. Pass down through the next bead and up through the bead after it. Repeat around the tube. At the end of the round, pass through the first beads of the previous and current rounds to step up to the new round.
Netting (Single Thread)
Netting (Single Thread)
Begin by stringing a base row of 13 beads. String 5 beads and go back through the fifth bead from the end of the base row. String another 5 beads, skip 3 beads of the base row, and go back through the next. Repeat to the end of the row, passing through the fifth, fourth, and third beads of those just strung and exiting from the third. Turn the work over and go back across the same way.
How-To: Single Strand Slider Bracelet
How-To: Single Strand Slider Bracelet
Join Caitlyn of Busy Beader as Elaine shows how to make a slide-clasp knot closure for stylish bracelets.
Pass Through vs. Pass Back Through
Pass Through vs. Pass Back Through
Pass through means to move your needle in the same direction that the beads have been strung. Pass back through means to move your needle in the opposite direction.
Flat Herringbone Stitch
Flat Herringbone Stitch
Begin with a foundation row of even-count ladder stitch. String 2 beads, pass down through the second to last bead in the ladder, and up through the next bead. String 2 beads, pass down the next bead and then up through the following. Repeat to the end of the row. To end the row, pass back through the last bead strung. To begin the next row, string 2 beads and pass down through the second to last bead of the previous row. Repeat, stringing 2 beads per stitch and passing down then up through two beads of the previous row. The 2-bead stitch will cause the beads to angle-up in each row, like a herringbone fabric.
Tubular Peyote Stitch
Tubular Peyote Stitch
String an even number of beads and make a foundation circle by passing through them two more times, exiting from the first bead strung. String 1 bead and pass through the third bead of the foundation circle. String 1 bead and pass through the fifth bead of the foundation circle. Continue adding 1 bead at a time, skipping over 1 bead of the first round, until you have added half the number of beads of the first round. Exit from the first bead of the second round. String1 bead, pass through the second bead added in the second round and pull thread tight. String 1 bead and pass through the third bead added in the second round. Continue around, filling in the ''spaces'' 1 bead at a time. Exit from the first bead added in each round.
Ladder Stitch
Ladder Stitch
Using two needles, one threaded on each end of the thread, pass one needle through one or more beads from left to right and pass the other needle through the same beads from right to left. Continue adding beads by crisscrossing both needles through one bead at a time. Use this stitch to make strings of beads or as the foundation for brick stitch. For a single-needle ladder, string 2 beads and pass through them again. String 1 bead. Pass through the last stitched bead and the one just strung. Repeat, adding one bead at a time and working in a figure-eight pattern.
 Flat Peyote Stitch
Flat Peyote Stitch
One-drop peyote stitch begins by stringing an even number of beads to create the first two rows. Begin the third row by stringing one bead and passing through the second-to-last bead of the previous rows. String another bead and pass through the fourth-to-last bead of the previous rows. Continue adding one bead at a time, passing over every other bead of the previous rows. Two-drop peyote stitch is worked the same as above, but with two beads at a time instead of one.
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5,614 Resources Found
Page 1 of 234